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Corridor Ravine to Tranquility Cracks

Corridor Ravine to Tranquility Cracks
CORRIDOR RAVINE TO TRANQUILITY CRACKS Duration

Duration

2 – 4 hours

CORRIDOR RAVINE TO TRANQUILITY CRACKS Difficulty

Difficulty

Easy – Moderate

CORRIDOR RAVINE TO TRANQUILITY CRACKS Trail Type

Trail Type

Circular

CORRIDOR RAVINE TO TRANQUILITY CRACKS Distance

Distance

6 km

Tranquility Cracks is one of Table Mountain’s hidden gems. It is made up of a series of fissures in the rocks which form a labyrinth of corridors and a tranquil home to some indigenous yellow wood trees.

Situated approximately half way along the Twelve Apostles Spine route, Tranquility Cracks can be reached by a number of trails leading up from Camps Bay. We suggest that you take Corridor Ravine, making it a circular route.

Corridor Ravine itself is one of the less exciting hikes on Table Mountain, but with Tranquility Cracks at the top it certainly makes for an enjoyable day on the mountain. And the views are magnificent!

You will find Corridor Ravine at the far end of the Pipe Track, past Slangholie Ravine, which is marked as ‘Dangerous assent’. (Signs like this are on the mountain for a reason – listen to them! Slangholie Ravine is officially closed due to numerous rock falls and should not be attempted).

In total it should take about 2-3 hours for a round trip (this excludes the time spent exploring Tranquility Cracks).

Getting started

Park at Theresa Avenue in Camps Bay. The earlier you go the better your parking spot will be. Alternatively you can park on Kloof Nek and walk along the entire Pipe Track but keep in mind that this will add about an hour to your hike, each way.

Once you’re on the Pipe Track, head in the direction of Hout Bay. Now you just keep on walking. You will pass through a small forest which is absolutely beautiful. If you’re doing this hike in the Winter time you will get the opportunity to walk underneath a small waterfall (recommended!). The rock formations and views during this stretch will have you mesmerized.

Heading up Corridor Ravine

You can’t go wrong once you’ve found the start of the trail. The path itself heads up a wide valley and is pretty much just one diagonal stretch to the top. Don’t try to be superman and race your way up – loose stones and sand are an issue. Take your time and admire your surroundings.

There is little to no shade throughout this section so we recommend getting started on the hike as early as possible before the sun hits its peak. Also, don’t forget your hat and sunscreen!

On to Tranquility Cracks

When you (finally) make it to the top of Corridor Ravine you’ll probably want to find a rock and rest for a minute. There are plenty of comfy rocks to perch on with a snack and a camera.

When you’re ready to go, turn left and walk for about 10 minutes (towards the cable car). Keep watch for a small, almost hidden, path in the middle of some fynbos on your left. From here, depending on which path you have taken (there’s more than one) you will find yourself on either side of Tranquility Cracks. You may feel lost, we certainly did, but go exploring and you’ll find a way in!

Leaving Tranquility Cracks you can either turn right and head back down Corridor Ravine, or turn left and make your way towards one of the many trails heading back down. These include Kasteelspoort, Woody Ravine and Diagonal. We recommend Woody Ravine – it’s shaded and it’s a lot more fun!

To get to Woody Ravine you will walk for about 20 minutes towards the cable car. There is a clear sign post when you get to it. It’s a bit of a scramble down so be prepared to get your hands dirty!

About The Author

Growing up in Cape Town, South Africa, I was always playing outside and road tripping with my family. And just like that, a love for the great outdoors was sparked in me. I've always felt happier when I'm outside - be it camping, hiking, or swimming. After graduating with a Bachelor of Psychology I knew that I did not want to spend my days indoors working a 9-5. I found that my true passion lies in travelling, in being outdoors and making my life an adventure, and in inspiring others to do the same.

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